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Main conference day

December 10, 2019

SCHEDULE 

 

Time 

 Auditorium Maximum 

Tower View

8.30-9.00 

Registration & Welcome Coffee 

 

9.00-9.30 

Welcome & 2 Keynotes

 

9.30-10.00 

Briefing: European digital capabilities, persistent hurdles, and options to evolve 

 

10.00-11.00 

Senior Panel: European digital capabilities, persistent hurdles, and options to evolve 

 

11.00-11.30 

 COFFEE BREAK 

 

11.30-12.00 

Briefing: Cybersecurity standards: Europe´s next big regulatory shot? 

 

Briefing: The rise of digital authoritarianism 

 

12.00-13.00 

Senior Panel: Cybersecurity standards: Europe´s next big regulatory shot? 

Senior Panel: The rise of digital authoritarianism 

 

13.00-14.00 

LUNCH 

 

14.00-14.30 

Briefing: Technology nationalism, digital sovereignty, and the open  digital market 

 

Briefing: The new AI in the military 

domain  

14.30-15.30 

Senior Panel: Technology nationalism, digital sovereignty, and the open   digital market 

Senior Panel: The new AI in the military 

domain 

 

15.30-16.00 

COFFEE BREAK 

 

16.00-16.30 

Briefing: Cyber defense strategies for Europe – Embracing “Persistent Engagement”? 

 

16.30-17.30 

Senior Panel: Cyber defense strategies for Europe – Embracing “Persistent Engagement”? 

 

17.30-18.00

CLOSING

 

Opening Speech:  

Track European digital capabilities, persistent hurdles, and options to evolve  

Europe's digital capabilities gap is not a new issue. But it is becoming increasingly serious. Two examples illustrate the trend: US tech companies like Google, Apple, Facebook, and Amazon already offer worldwide platforms for any kind of digital business and digital life. Now they start managing and processing people’s health data worldwide. Apps for Apple devices enable healthcare professionals to use the data to deliver effective and personalized treatment to patients. With the help of data-driven technology, Chinese firms are massively expanding in the area of autonomous driving. The three major tech companies Baidu, Alibaba and Tencent are developing technologies for networked cars. The Chinese government plans to have 30 million automotive vehicles on the roads by 2030. Looking at these examples, we have to conclude that European calls for “digital sovereignty” have not yet led to any concrete actions that make European firms competitive globally. This is not for a lack of political will: the EU has launched a multitude of initiatives to promote digital technological excellence in Europe, including artificial intelligence, chip technology, and secure cloud services. But European countries and the EU frequently fail to progress from paper to reality.  
This panel will address this “implementation gap”. Where do we find such gaps? What are persistent reasons for such gaps? How can we overcome them? Do we discuss things to death, while others are building tech and start thinking about consequences only when they get to the implementation and if yes, is this approach (still) feasible? Do we have our overly cautious culture to a more risk-loving culture?

Speaker (Panel):  

Speaker (Briefing):  

Track Cybersecurity standards: Europe´s next big regulatory shot? 

With the General Data Protection Regulation, the European Union has set a regulatory standard for data protection that has an effect far beyond Europe. Many countries in the world take the European rules as an example for their legislation. Globally operating companies implement the GDPR as a standard for data protection compliance.  Regulation in the area of cyber security is far more difficult. Not only does GDPR already include requirements for the security of IT systems, special regulations for critical infrastructures or the amendment of cyber aspects in safety regulation together form a challenging regulatory environment. In contrast to China and Russia with their clear focus on surveillance, the principles of cyber security regulation in the USA and Europe do not differ greatly, but the specific compliance requirements for companies do. Can Europe repeat the GDPR story with cyber security? What can a transatlantic regulatory framework look like? 

Speaker (Panel):  

  • Dr. rer. pol. Annegret Bendiek, Senior Associate, Research Division EU/Europe, German Institute for International and Security Affairs, Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik (SWP)
  • Dr. Martin Emele, Vice President Cybersecurity, Robert Bosch GmbH
  • Andrew J. Grotto, Research Fellow, Hoover Institution and William J. Perry International Security Fellow, Center for International Security and Cooperation, Stanford University
  • Bodo Meseke, Partner, Forensic & Integrity Services, Chief Technology Officer, EY 
  • Moderation: Martin Schallbruch, Deputy Director, Digital Society Institute, ESMT Berlin

Speaker (Briefing):  

Track Cybersecurity standards: Europe´s next big regulatory shot? 

The rise of technology has created new opportunities for democracies to engage with their electorate, provide transparent e-government services and make the government more accessible. For authoritarian regimes, technology has given them unprecedented capabilities to restrict speech, conduct ubiquitous surveillance and consolidate their power in the remaining pockets of discontent. This panel expands on how authoritarian regimes leverage technology and the ways it can be combated. 

Speaker (Panel):  

  • Dr. Sandro Gaycken, Director, Digital Society Institute, ESMT Berlin
  • Hauke Gierow, G DATA CyberDefense 
  • Dr. Lior Tabansky, Head of Research Development, Blavatnik Interdisciplinary Cyber Research Center (Blavatnik ICRC), Tel Aviv University, Israel 
  • Moderation: Dr. David Mussington, Professor of the Practice and Director, Center for Public Policy and Private Enterprise, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland

Speaker (Briefing):  

  • Dr. Lior Tabansky, Head of Research Development, Blavatnik Interdisciplinary Cyber Research Center (Blavatnik ICRC), Tel Aviv University, Israel 

Track Technology nationalism, digital sovereignty, and the open digital market  

Digital technologies transcend territorial borders. At the same time, they are tools for the assertion of political and economic influence, as well as for the enforcement of frontiers in the digital domain. Growing interdependence can become “weaponized”. The conflict over the deployment of Chinese equipment in 5G mobile networks illustrates this trend. Throughout the past years, the United States and China have emerged as two competing global powers which drive innovation, development and deployment of key digital technologies. Other highly industrialized nations in Europe and Japan so far have been slower in developing and diffusing scalable innovations. These countries need to devise strategies to navigate their dependencies on foreign technologies and the geopolitical aspects associated therewith. In this context, the incoming European Commission has declared it would make the strengthening of “technological sovereignty” a priority. Yet, an overarching strategy and operationalization of this concept is still lacking.  

This panel will discuss some of the following questions:  

  • What is Europe’s position in the context of growing tech rivalry between the US, China, and other countries?  
  • Which political, economic and technological challenges will it need to address?  
  • How should European countries manage dependencies on foreign technologies while adhering to the principles of an open economy and competition, as well as values of free societies?  
  • Is European “technological sovereignty” a viable objective or a pipe dream?  
  • How can Europe strengthen its own digital industrial base and promote the development of cutting-edge technologies at home?    

Speaker (Panel):  

  • Raziye Buse Çetin, AI Policy Researcher & Project Manager, The Future Society
  • Ambassador Hinrich Thoelken, Special Representative for International Digitalisation Policy and Digital Transformation of the German Federal Foreign Office
  • Paul Timmers, Visiting Research Fellow, Centre for Technology and Global Affairs, Oxford University
  • Shinichi Yokohama, Chief Information Security Officer, NTT Corporation
  • Moderation: Isabel Skierka, Researcher, Digital Society Institute, ESMT Berlin

Speaker (Briefing): 

Track The new AI in the military domain 

There is a lot of hype about the potential and promise that artificial intelligence will bring from all aspects of life, from health care to smart cities to the military. The hype, however, has yet to match expectations of personalized medicine and autonomous smart cities. In the military there has been a lot of talk about autonomous weapons systems and the possibility to automate intelligence collection and analysis. But where lies the truth of the viable nature of this technology? What are the pragmatic use-cases? Where and how can this technology be implemented? This panel goes beyond the AI hype and straight to the AI reality in the military. 

Speaker (Panel):  

Speaker (Briefing): 

  • John C. Mallery, Researcher, MIT Computer Science & Artificial Intelligence Laboratory 

Track Cyber defense strategies for Europe – Embracing “Persistent Engagement”? 

Cyberspace is increasingly being used for adversarial activity. Western states, mainly the US, react with a further militarization of cyberspace, chiefly by means of their strategy of “Persistent Engagement” – what does this strategy mean in detail? What are its implications politically and legally? Should other states, mainly the EU, adopt a similar strategy or rather focus on civilian cyber defense? How to retain international cyber stability under such circumstances?  

Speaker (Panel):  

  • Dr. Reinhard Brandl, Member of the German Bundestag 
  • Dr. Chris C. Demchak, RDML Grace Murray Hopper Chair of Cyber Security, Senior Cyber Scholar, Cyber and Innovation Policy Institute, Strategic & Operational Research Department, CNWS, United States Naval War College (USNWC) 
  • Dr. Henning Lahmann, Senior Researcher, Digital Society Institute, ESMT Berlin
  • Moderation: Dr. Sandro Gaycken, Director, Digital Society Institute, ESMT Berlin 

Speaker (Briefing):  

  • Dr. Chris C. Demchak, RDML Grace Murray Hopper Chair of Cyber Security, Senior Cyber Scholar, Cyber and Innovation Policy Institute, Strategic & Operational Research Department, CNWS, United States Naval War College (USNWC)