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DSI Publications
Book Chapter
In Handbuch Digitalisierung in Staat und Verwaltung, 2nd ed., edited by Tanja Klenk, Frank Nullmeier, Göttrik Wewer, Wiesbaden: Springer VS.
Subject(s)
Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Digital identity, digitization, public administration, European Union

The book chapter "Digital Identity" in the Handbook "Digitization of the State and Public Administration" analyzes digital identification and authentification technologies and their impact in public administration and society. First, it introduces and defines the concept of digital identity. Second, it gives an overview of the technologies' applications in public administration and beyond. Third, it analyzes their governance and implementation in Europe and Germany. Fourth, it presents perspectives for the future development of digital identity in increasingly networked societies.
Secondary Title
Handbuch Digitalisierung in Staat und Verwaltung
Edition
2nd ed.,
Subject(s)
Information technology and systems
Keyword(s)
Sovereignty, cyberspace, cyber operations, Tallinn Manual, cyber sovereignty, digital sovereignty, defend forward, persistent engagement
The article critically examines the current discourse on the legal status and substance of “sovereignty” in the context of the application of international law to cyberspace against the backdrop of conflicting political-ideological attitudes. After tracing the origins of the interpretation of “respect for sovereignty” as a primary rule of international law, two approaches to cyberspace are surveyed that challenge the emerging consensus: “cyber imperialism,” embodied by the US and the other Five Eyes members on the one hand, and “cyber Westphalia,” represented by China, Russia, and Iran on the other. Both conceive cyberspace in ways fundamentally irreconcilable with prevailing legal views. A third group of states endorses the “sovereignty-as-rule” understanding but leaves this legal position vulnerable to both authoritarian co-optation and imperialist dismissal. In light of this, the paper offers an alternative interpretation of state practice and international jurisprudence that constructs sovereignty as a principle with derivative primary rules. It is shown that despite not by itself having the status of a rule, the principle of sovereignty allows for the identification of rules that protect the territorial integrity and political independence of states beyond the traditional notions of the prohibition of intervention and the use of force. Following a careful analysis of evidence in existing practice in support of this novel, doctrinally more precise understanding of sovereignty, the policies of “persistent engagement” and “cyber sovereignty” are assessed in light of the argument’s legal implications.
ISSN (Online)
2328-9708
ISSN (Print)
1053-6736
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment
Keyword(s)
Cybersecurity, governance, Brexit, EU-UK relations, European Union, United Kingdom


The book chapter analyzes the EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement's (TCA) Chapter on future thematic cooperation on cybersecurity. It explains the broader political, technological and regulatory context of cybersecurity cooperation at the international and the EU levels. It then analyzes the TCA's passages individually and within this broader context. Finally, it provides an evaluation and outlook on future EU-UK cooperation on cybersecurity.
Secondary Title
Handels- und Kooperationsvertrag EU/GB
ISBN
978-3-8487-7188-2
Journal Article
kes – Die Zeitschrift für Informations-Sicherheit 38 (1)
Lola Attenberger (2022)
Subject(s)
Information technology and systems
Keyword(s)
cybersecurity, urban crisis management, digital policy, civil protection, disaster management
Critical infrastructure protection is a joint task of the state and the economy. Nevertheless, there does not yet exist any standardized approach for a common risk management approach. This article proposes such a methodology, leaning on ISO 27000-series and implying three perspectives: the technical, micro perspective, the organizational macro perspective besides the country-wide meta perspective.
Volume
38
Book Chapter
In The Oxford Handbook of Cyber Security, edited by Paul Cornish, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Secondary Title
The Oxford Handbook of Cyber Security
ISBN
9780198800682
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment; Information technology and systems; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Cybersecurity, information security, information law, critical infrastructures, cyber regulation
Two articles explain the genesis and contents of the German IT Security Act 2.0, which was enacted in May 2021. This first article focuses on the origins of the law, the obligations of companies as operators of information technology, and the new regulations on the security of IT products.
Journal Pages
450–458
ISSN (Online)
2194-4172
Journal Article
Datenschutz und Datensicherheit 45 (7): 438–443
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment; Information technology and systems; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
AI, artificial intelligence, privay, data protection, information law
The European Commission has presented proposals for the horizontal regulation of artificial intelligence. It is thus foreseeable that the regulatory systems of data protection and IT security will be supplemented by a further cross-sectoral approach to the regulation of information technology. This article explains the proposals and describes their advantages and disadvantages.

[Die Europäische Kommission hat Vorschläge vorgelegt, wie eine horizontale Regulierung künstlicher Intelligenz erfolgen soll. Damit ist absehbar, dass neben die Regulierungssysteme des Datenschutzes und der IT-Sicherheit ein weiterer sektorübergreifender Ansatz zur Regulierung von Informationstechnik treten wird.]
Volume
45
Journal Pages
438–443
ISSN (Online)
1862-2607
ISSN (Print)
1614-0702
Subject(s)
Diversity and inclusion; Economics, politics and business environment; Ethics and social responsibility; Health and environment; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
disinformation, social media, oral culture, fact-checking
JEL Code(s)
I0
The article examines the risk of the proliferation of potentially harmful disinformation through 'oral' social media services such as Clubhouse. While false or misleading information may have fewer means to stick and go viral, it is also more difficult to fact-check speakers, which may create new vulnerabilities for the information ecosystem online.
Journal Article
International Cybersecurity Law Review 2 (1): 77–92
Andrew J. Grotto, Martin Schallbruch (2021)
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment; Information technology and systems; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Transatlantic, data protection, internet of things, artificial intelligence, industrial control systems (ICS)
Volume
2
Journal Pages
77–92
ISSN (Online)
2662-9739
ISSN (Print)
2662-9720
Subject(s)
Ethics and social responsibility; Health and environment; Information technology and systems
Keyword(s)
misinformation, health information, disinformation, social media, facebook, oversight board, freedom of expression, pandemic, covid-19
The article examines the first decisions issued by Facebook's newly established Oversight Board that deal with the exacerbating problem of health misinformation. In this context, it is questioned whether the Board's applied standard of 'imminent harm' is suitable for the problem at hand given the viral proliferation of potentially consequential false and misleading information about public health policies amid a pandemic.