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DSI Publications
Subject(s)
Information technology and systems
Keyword(s)
Information operations, cyber operations, cognitive warfare, disinformation, election interference, principle of non-intervention, sovereignty, self-determination
The article examines the legal qualification of state-led information operations that aim to undermine democratic decision-making processes in other states. After a survey of the legal attitudes of states towards such operations during the Cold War, the impact of the digital transformation on the frequency and quality of information operations is explained. The article then assesses scholarly responses to the outlined paradigm shift regarding the prohibition of intervention, respect for sovereignty and the principle of self-determination. The study then inquires whether it is possible to detect a change in how states qualify adversarial information operations by tracking recent state practice and official statements of opinio juris. The survey concludes that there is insufficient uniformity to allow for an inference that the content of the analysed rules of customary international law has already shifted towards more restrictive treatment of foreign interference. As a possible way forward, the article ends with a proposal to focus on deceptive and manipulative conduct of information operations as the most viable path to outlaw such state behavior in the future. Instead of attempting to regulate the content of information, this approach is better suited to safeguard freedom of speech and other potentially affected civil rights.
Volume
53
Journal Pages
1–36
ISSN (Online)
2047-9336
ISSN (Print)
0021-2237
Subject(s)
Information technology and systems
Keyword(s)
IT security, international law, cybersecurity
ISBN
978-3-8487-5764-0
Subject(s)
Information technology and systems
Keyword(s)
International law, cybersecurity, cyberattacks, attribution, necessity, rule of law, special emergency regime
The article deals with necessity as one of the circumstances precluding wrongfulness under customary international law and how it will likely gain relevance in view of the difficulty to quickly attribute malicious cyber operations that threaten important assets of a state. While the necessity doctrine seems fit for purpose, it lacks granularity and is problematic from an international rule-of-law point of view. Taking these pitfalls into account, the article proposes some general principles for a possible special emergency regime for cyberspace.
Book Chapter
In IT-Sicherheitsrecht, edited by Gerrit Hornung, Martin Schallbruch, Baden-Baden: Nomos.
Subject(s)
Information technology and systems
Keyword(s)
international law, cybersecurity, united nations, use of force, intervention, sovereignty, internet governance, arms control, cyber operations
The chapter summarises the current state of the application of international law to cyberspace and reviews attempts to find consensus among the community of states. While virtually all states agree that international law applies to state conduct in cyberspace, the 'how' remains a hotly contested issue. The chapter focuses on the prohibition of the use of force, the prohibition of intervention, and the principle of sovereignty and assesses their legal status vis-à-vis cyber operations. It follows a brief treatment of further international efforts to increase transnational cybersecurity, such as internet governance and arms control treaties.
Secondary Title
IT-Sicherheitsrecht
ISBN
978-3-8487-5764-0
Book Chapter
In Oxford Handbook of Cyber Security, edited by Paul Cornish, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Secondary Title
Oxford Handbook of Cyber Security
Keyword(s)
COVID-19, WHO, international law, international responsibility, International Court of Justice, reparation, compensation, pandemic, International Health Regulations, no harm principle, causality
Subject(s)
Information technology and systems; Strategy and general management
Keyword(s)
Digital identity, digitale Identitäten, e-governance, digital sovereignty, digitale Souveränität
Vom 1. Januar 2018 bis zum 31. März 2020 hat das Digital Society Institute (DSI) der ESMT Berlin ein Begleitforschungsprojekt zu digitalen Identitäten mit Unterstützung der Verimi GmbH durchgeführt. Im Rahmen des Projekts fanden acht halbtägige Fach-Workshops mit jeweils 15 bis 30 externen Experten und Praktikern unterschiedlicher Stakeholdergruppen aus Politik, Wirtschaft, Wissenschaft und Zivilgesellschaft sowie eine Konferenz zu digitalen Identitäten an der ESMT Berlin statt. Die Workshops befassten sich mit der Rolle digitaler Plattformen im Bereich des digitalen Identitäten-Managements in spezifischen Sektoren sowie mit sektorübergreifenden Fragestellungen hinsichtlich der Daseinsvorsorge, Datenschutz und -souveränität sowie Interoperabilität, Offenheit und Datenportabilität. Die Ergebnisse der Fach-Workshops sind in den folgenden acht Papieren zusammengefasst.
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From January 1, 2018, to March 31, 2020, the Digital Society Institute (DSI) at ESMT Berlin conducted a research project on digital identities with support from Verimi GmbH. The project included eight workshops with 15 to 30 external experts and practitioners from politics, business, academia, and civil society, as well as a conference on digital identities at ESMT Berlin. The workshops addressed the role of digital platforms in digital identity management in specific sectors as well as cross-sectoral issues, such as data protection and data sovereignty, interoperability, openness and data portability. The results of the specialist workshops are summarised in the following eight papers.
Pages
41
DSI Industrial & Policy Recommendations Series (IPR)
DSI Industrial & Policy Recommendations Series (IPR)
Martin Schallbruch, Tanja Strüve, Isabel Skierka (2020)
Subject(s)
Information technology and systems; Strategy and general management
Keyword(s)
Digitale Identitäten, E-Governance, Innovation, Digitalpolitik
Am 4. März 2020 war das Digital Society Institute der ESMT Gastgeber der Konferenz Digitale Identitäten 2020, die unter der Schirmherrschaft des Bundesministeriums des Innern, für Bau und Heimat sowie des Bundesministeriums für Wirtschaft und Energie an der ESMT ausgerichtet wurde. Ziel der Konferenz war es, gemeinsam mit Stakeholdern aus Politik, Wissenschaft und Wirtschaft der Frage nachzugehen, wie eine sektorübergreifende Strategie für digitale Identitäten aussehen kann. Im Plenum und in vier sektoralen Workshops – in den Bereichen Bildung, Gesundheit, Mobilität und öffentlicher Verwaltung – diskutierten die Teilnehmerinnen und Teilnehmer über Anforderungen an digitale Identitäten, innersektorale Strategien zur Flächendeckung innerhalb des Sektors sowie über eine Strategie für eine sektorübergreifende digitale Identität.


Pages
7
Analysis
In The convergence puzzle: Australia, Germany and emerging cybersecurity trends, 3 vols. edited by Katja Theodorakis, 35–40. Barton, Australia: Konrad Adenauer Foundation.
Subject(s)
Strategy and general management; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
5G, technological sovereignty, Europe, cybersecurity, industrial policy
The challenges that the EU faces with 5G go beyond cyber and national security threats. For Europe, the rollout of the 5G infrastructure has become a geopolitical test on several levels. Will Europe be a shaper or taker of 5G technology and the new era of industrialization it promises to propel? How will it be able to control the security and reliability of such key digital infrastructures in the long-term? Eventually, how should EU member states manage their dependencies on foreign technologies and strengthen their “technological sovereignty” – a political priority of the incoming EU Commission led by Ursula von der Leyen? The latter might be the most important strategic issue the EU will need to tackle in the long-term and will be decisive for the Union’s ability to shape its own future in the digital age.


Secondary Title
The convergence puzzle: Australia, Germany and emerging cybersecurity trends
Journal Pages
35–40
Subject(s)
Health and environment; Information technology and systems
Keyword(s)
COVID-19, pandemic, cyberattacks, necessity, attribution, rule of law, international law, hospitals