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Publications
Conference Proceeding
Academy of Management Proceedings 2020 (1)
Ingo Marquart, Matthew S. Bothner, Nghi Truong (2020)
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior; Management sciences, decision sciences and quantitative methods
We develop a novel method that integrates techniques from machine learning with canonical concepts from network analysis in order to examine how the meaning of leadership has evolved over time. Using articles in Harvard Business Review from 1990 through 2019, we induce yearly semantic networks comprised of roles structurally equivalent to the role of leader. Such roles, from which leader derives meaning, vary in content from coach and colleague to commander and dictator. Yearly shifts in the structural equivalence of leader to clusters of thematically-linked roles reveals a decline in the degree to which leadership is associated with consultative activities and a corresponding rise in the extent to which a leader is understood to occupy a hierarchical position. Our analyses further reveal that the role of leader comes to eclipse the role of manager, measured through changes in pagerank centrality as well as betweenness centrality over the course of our panel. Implications for new research on leadership, culture, and networks are discussed."
With permission of the Academy of Management
Volume
2020
ISSN (Online)
2151-6561
ISSN (Print)
0065-0668
Conference Proceeding
Academy of Management Proceedings 2018 (1)
Ingo Marquart, Nghi Truong, Matthew S. Bothner (2018)
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment; Entrepreneurship
What should a CEO do to increase the social multiplier of a startup? What organizational strategy, in other words, should a manager adopt to shape informal social interactions among employees, so that they perform better in the office than if they telecommuted? We develop a network-based model that contrasts two opposing approaches. The first, consistent with Coleman’s vision of social capital, is embedding. Using an embedding strategy, the CEO fosters strong and dense ties among employees, and thus seeks to raise productivity by facilitating knowledge spillovers and creating social pressure. The second, keeping with White’s theory of social control, is decoupling. Using a decoupling strategy, the CEO promotes weak and sparse connections among employees, and so tries to increase productivity by minimizing distraction. Our findings indicate that, while embedding is generally preferable to decoupling for most kinds of organizations, decoupling is clearly preferable when two conditions are jointly met: the organization’s distribution of human capital is left-skewed and it is populated more by “slackers,” who “look down” in order to self-enhance, than by “climbers” who “look up” to self-improve. Our results also suggest that the zone of network irrelevance–that is, the space of possibilities over which the CEO’s efforts to rewire the network will prove inconsequential–paradoxically contracts as the firm grows: counter to a prevailing picture of small firms as inherently malleable, our model suggests that a CEO achieves less through shaping informal social interactions when the organization is not yet at scale. Implications for future research on networks and organizations are discussed.
With permission of the Academy of Management
Volume
2018
ISSN (Online)
2151-6561
ISSN (Print)
0065-0668
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment; Management sciences, decision sciences and quantitative methods; Strategy and general management
Keyword(s)
Machiavellian, informal organization, social networks
Subject(s)
Management sciences, decision sciences and quantitative methods; Strategy and general management
Keyword(s)
Leadership, NLP, Semantic Analysis
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment; Management sciences, decision sciences and quantitative methods; Strategy and general management
Keyword(s)
Networks, Embedding, Decoupling, Social Multiplier
JEL Code(s)
M210