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Working papers
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s)
getting-ahead similarity, leader-follower dyads, job performance evaluation, self-enhancement, 360-degree instruments
Status-seeking behaviors are linked to executive career progression, but do leaders appreciate being surrounded by followers eager to move up in the organizational hierarchy? Building on the self-enhancement theory, we propose that leaders with high self-assessed getting-ahead behaviors give better performance evaluations to subordinates who also have willingness to get ahead behaviors. In contrast, leaders with low self-assessed getting-ahead behaviors are quite reserved about the performance of subordinates high in the getting-ahead dimension. We also propose that overall, ambitious leaders evaluate more positively their followers’ performance than leaders with more modest desire to get ahead. We suggest that this effect is magnified when the status differential between the leader and the follower is reduced due to differences in age or hierarchical level (i.e., a younger leader or too few hierarchical levels between the leader and the subordinate). The results obtained by using polynomial regression and response surface techniques to analyze a sample of 138 leader-follower dyads supported our hypotheses showing a supervisor’s contextual performance ratings skew rooted in leaders’ desire to get ahead. We conclude by deriving the theoretical and practical implications of these findings.
Pages
35
ISSN (Print)
1866–3494
Working Paper
INSEAD Working Paper No. 2011/23/IGLC
Laura Guillén, Elizabeth Florent-Treacy (2011)
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s)
professional transitions, learning methods, leadership development
Leadership effectiveness can be divided into two broad categories that include 'getting along' behaviours (teamwork and empowerment of others) and/or 'getting ahead' behaviours (visioning, energizing, designing and rewarding). This study examines the effects of emotional intelligence on getting along and getting ahead leadership behaviours at work. Results from an analysis of a dataset derived from a 360° leadership behaviour survey completed by 929 managers indicated that emotional intelligence had a significant effect on collaborative behaviours at work, and that collaborative behaviours directly affected the inspirational side of leadership performance. Further, getting along behaviours were found to fully mediate the relationship between emotional intelligence and getting ahead behaviours. Theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
A pdf file of this working paper may be available at INSEAD.
Pages
29
Working Paper
INSEAD Working Paper No. 2009/07/OB
Published in: Human Performance 26 (1): 66–92 entitled: Competencies, personality traits, and job performance outcomes of middle managers: A motive-based approach.
Laura Guillén, Willem E. Saris (2009)
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s)
competencies, motives, emotional intelligence
In this study, we analyse empirically a competency model. We assert that the emotional intelligence (EI) model may not be the best way of grouping managerial competencies and we propose a new way of embedding competencies within a motivational domain. We build on McClelland's concept of motives to propose a new way of grouping competencies. This study is base on data from employees of three medium-sized organization (n=223) who complete a competency measure based on the proposal by Boyatzis and Goleman. We analyse empirically which of the factor structures (EI or motive-based) best fits the data. Our results confirm the appropriateness of grouping competencies into three clusters which have parallels with the three social motives of affiliation, power and achievement. Our study seeks to overcome the paucity of empirical research relevant to competency models and to expand the competency literature towards a theory of work motivation. Implications are drawn and future research directions are suggested.
A pdf file of this working paper may be available at INSEAD.
Pages
31
Working Paper
INSEAD Working Paper No. 2009/10/EFE/IGLC
Published in International handbook of work and health psychology, 3rd ed., ed. Cary L. Cooper, James Campbell Quick, Marc J. Schabracq, 411–426. London: Wiley.
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s)
leadership, organization change, stress, oganizational culture
How do organizations become and remain great places to work? That is the question that primarily motivates this chapter. The authors claim that is precisely the adaptive capability of self-renewal which characterizes great places to work. But changing mindsets is never easy and the need for adaptation usually induces a high degree of stress, both at individual and organizational levels. Even if a simple recipe for facing continuous adaptation does not exist, learning how to manage organizational change processes effectively may serve as a platform to motivate people to create better organizations and to keep individual and organizational stress at acceptable levels. This chapter discusses the internal and external pressures that may trigger organizational changes. Then, it explores the four stages of the organizational change process - creating a shared mindset, changing behaviour, institutionalizing change, and transforming the organization. Implications and challenges for practitioners are drawn.
A pdf file of this working paper may be available at INSEAD.
Pages
25