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Publications
Editorial
Academy of Management Journal 59 (1): 1–13
Gerard George, Linus Dahlander, Scott D. Graffin, Samantha Sim (2016)
Subject(s)
Technology, R&D management
Volume
59
Journal Pages
1–13
Conference Proceeding
Academy of Management Proceedings 2015 (1)
Henning Piezunka, Linus Dahlander (2015)
Subject(s)
Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Crowdsourcing, innovation, search
Rejections are common in everyday life, yet their consequences for individual behavior remain little studied. We examine a situation in which organizations invite people outside their boundaries to provide suggestions for formal action. Organizations that receive such suggestions can choose to act upon them, ignore them, or even reject them. While rejections carry a cost (i.e., potentially alienating the suggestion-maker), they are also an important source for motivation and learning. We unite these opposing views and argue that rejections can under certain conditions increase effort; moreover, we document how people learn by changing their behavior when trying again.
With permission of the Academy of Management
Volume
2015
ISSN (Online)
2151-6561
ISSN (Print)
0065-0668
Editorial
Academy of Management Journal 58 (3): 649–657
Daan van Knippenberg, Linus Dahlander, Martine R. Haas, Gerard George (2015)
Subject(s)
Technology, R&D management
Volume
58
Journal Pages
649–657
Conference Proceeding
Academy of Management Proceedings 2014 (1)
Linus Dahlander, Siobhan O'Mahony, David Gann (2014)
Subject(s)
Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
search, innovation, individuals, attention, scientists
The ‘variance hypothesis’ predicts that external search breadth will lead to innovation outcomes, but time for search is fixed and cultivating breadth takes time. How does individuals’ external search breadth affect innovation outcomes? We match survey data with complete patent records, to examine the search behaviors of elite experts at one of the world’s most innovative firms. Counter to expectations, individuals who spent more time inside the firm were more likely to be innovative. Individuals with high external search breadth were more innovative only when they allocated more attention to those sources. Our research identifies limits to the ‘variance hypothesis’ and reveals two successful approaches to innovation search: ‘cosmopolitans’ who cultivate and attend to external sources and ‘locals’ who draw upon internal sources.
With permission of the Academy of Management
Volume
2014
ISSN (Online)
2151-6561
ISSN (Print)
0065-0668
Conference Proceeding
Academy of Management Proceedings 2013 (1)
Linus Dahlander, Henning Piezunka (2013)
This paper analyzes attempts to build user ideation communities aimed at inviting users to submit ideas and suggestions for future organizational actions. While earlier work has elaborated on the advantages of communities once they are created, our findings show that the ‘average’ organization struggles to build a vibrant community: most simply wither or die. We develop an argument about the importance of committing resources in the forms of (1) employees who submit suggestions to the community and (2) accepting suggestions from people in the community, and particularly suggestions from newcomers. Our findings suggest that creating communities often requires significant attention from the organizations seeking to develop them. However, our results are contingent upon the stage of the community, where we see different effects depending on whether the community has a history of accumulating suggestions or not. Our work has implications for scholars of open innovation by highlighting the importance of considering the innumerable failures, showing how focusing on communities that have reached a certain size can lead to misleading conclusions and specifying some conditions that explain why some are more successful than others.
With permission of the Academy of Management
Volume
2013
ISSN (Online)
2151-6561
ISSN (Print)
0065-0668
Subject(s)
Entrepreneurship; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
innovation
Pages
48
Conference Proceeding
Academy of Management Proceedings 2009 (1)
Paola Criscuolo, Linus Dahlander, Ammon Salter (2009)
Subject(s)
Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Innovation management, organizational sociology research, knowledge transfer, business networks, interorganizational networks, information sharing
The article proposes five hypotheses related to the question of why some people acquire innovative status within organizations. The discussion focuses on the external ties of the organization, the effect of knowledge heterogeneity on employees' innovative status, the idea that networking produces knowledge diversity, and the implication that there are individual differences in how intra- and extra-organizational relations affect people. The research methods include coefficient estimates calculated from a negative binomial model and a survey of consultant engineers who work in multidisciplinary and multinational organizations.
Volume
2009
ISSN (Online)
2151-6561
ISSN (Print)
0065-0668
Editorial
Industry and Innovation 15 (2): 115–123
Linus Dahlander, Lars Frederiksen, Francesco Rullani (2008)
Subject(s)
Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
open innovation; communities; value creation
How can firms make use of online communities as part of an innovation strategy aimed at leveraging resources and ideas outside the four walls of the enterprise? Online communities are today a widespread phenomenon that takes a variety of forms. Free and open source software is probably the most well-known case, where geographically dispersed individuals collectively develop new software and produce innovation. In 1991 Linus Torvalds founded the Linux kernel, the heart of an operating system with the ability to have a real impact on Microsoft's market share. Torvalds' initial ideas led to the building of a community that collectively developed the Linux kernel. From the original incorporation of some 10,000 lines of source code, by 2005 the community had developed more than 6,000,000 lines of code. But online communities are more than simply free and open source software. For instance, social networking sites such as Facebook and MySpace, which have memberships of millions, have grown rapidly, allowing individuals to share experiences and socialize with each other. From initially being exclusively for participation by Harvard students, Facebook, according to recent estimates, now has more than 60 million users worldwide. The popular press has been swift to document these successes, and it is tempting to conclude that online communities have great potential. Yet, their diversity, in terms of objectives, typology of organization, production and reasons behind individuals' use of them, is becoming obvious.
Volume
15
Journal Pages
115–123
Conference Proceeding
Academy of Management Proceedings 1 (August): 1–6
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s)
Human capital, infrastructure, open source software, leaders, leadership, management, technocracy
Volume
1
Journal Pages
1–6
ISSN (Online)
2151-6561
ISSN (Print)
0065-0668