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Publications
Journal Article
Management Science 63 (3): 587–608
Thomas Hildebrand, Manju Puri, Jörg Rocholl (2017)
Subject(s)
Finance, accounting and corporate governance
Keyword(s)
Financial disintermediation, crowdfunding, consumer lending
JEL Code(s)
G01, G20, G21, G23
This paper analyzes the substantially growing markets for crowdfunding, in which retail investors lend to borrowers without financial intermediaries. Critics suggest these markets allow sophisticated investors to take advantage of unsophisticated investors. The growth and viability of these markets critically depends on the underlying incentives. We provide evidence of perverse incentives in crowdfunding that are not fully recognized by the market. In particular we look at group leader bids in the presence of origination fees and find that these bids are (wrongly) perceived as a signal of good loan quality, resulting in lower interest rates. Yet these loans actually have higher default rates. These adverse incentives are overcome only with sufficient skin in the game and when there are no origination fees. The results from the analysis in this paper provide more general implications for crowdfunding, its structure and regulation.
© 2016 INFORMS
Volume
63
Journal Pages
587–608
Journal Article
Research Policy 43 (6): 1002–1013
Francis Bidault, Thomas Hildebrand (2014)
Subject(s)
Strategy and general management; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Co-authorship, academic partnership, joint research, joint publication, asymmetric authorship, benefits sharing
Partnerships can be found in many areas of social and economic life. These arrangements have become particularly common in research and development activities where organizations increasingly look for partners to complement their own technological capabilities with a view to create innovative products and processes. R&D partnerships, however, are fraught with challenges because the conditions for creativity through cooperation are still not fully understood. Academic partnerships are also very common and offer a fertile ground for investigation. Academic cooperation takes many different forms and results in a wide range of outcomes (Laband and Tollison, 2000). One of the most visible outcomes is co-authored publications (Melin and Persson, 1996). Nowadays, there is extensive data available about both the context of these partnerships as well as the quality of their outcome. This paper explores the determinants of the gain for authors who cooperate through co-authorship in the publication of academic articles. We distinguish between short-term benefits (i.e. the increase in citations of the co-authored article relative to the authors’ previous publications) and the long-term ones (i.e. the increase in citations of articles subsequent to the co-authored piece). We find evidence that these benefits have different determinants for co-authors depending on their past experience. While co-authorship generally seems to benefit more the junior (younger and with a lower academic reputation) author, the senior partner can reduce the gap with a strong personal track record and co-authoring experience.
With permission of Elsevier
Volume
43
Journal Pages
1002–1013
Journal Article
Journal of Information Technology 25 (2): 109–125
Hanna Krasnova, Sarah Spiekermann, Ksenia Koroleva, Thomas Hildebrand (2010)
Subject(s)
Information technology and systems
Keyword(s)
Online social networks, online communities, motivation, privacy, information disclosure, structural equation modeling
Volume
25
Journal Pages
109–125