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Publication records
Book Chapter
In Handbuch Digitalisierung in Staat und Verwaltung, 2nd ed., edited by Tanja Klenk, Frank Nullmeier, Göttrik Wewer, Wiesbaden: Springer VS.
Subject(s)
Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Digital identity, digitization, public administration, European Union

The book chapter "Digital Identity" in the Handbook "Digitization of the State and Public Administration" analyzes digital identification and authentification technologies and their impact in public administration and society. First, it introduces and defines the concept of digital identity. Second, it gives an overview of the technologies' applications in public administration and beyond. Third, it analyzes their governance and implementation in Europe and Germany. Fourth, it presents perspectives for the future development of digital identity in increasingly networked societies.
Secondary Title
Handbuch Digitalisierung in Staat und Verwaltung
Edition
2nd ed.,
Journal Article
The Economic Journal
Bernd Fitzenberger, Gary Mena, Jan Sebastian Nimczik, Uwe Sunde
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment
JEL Code(s)
D8, J1
Economists increasingly recognise the importance of personality traits for socio-economic outcomes, but little is known about the stability of these traits over the life cycle. Existing empirical contributions typically focus on age patterns and disregard cohort and period influences. This paper contributes novel evidence for the separability of age, period, and cohort effects for a broad range of personality traits based on systematic specification tests for disentangling age, period and cohort influences. Our estimates document that for different cohorts, the evolution of personality traits across the life cycle follows a stable, though non-constant, age profile, while there are sizeable differences across time periods.
ESMT Case Study
ESMT Case Study No. ESMT-321-0193-1
Claire Cardy, Bianca Schmitz, Olaf Plötner, Johannes Habel
Subject(s)
Strategy and general management
Keyword(s)
Corporate strategy, global trends, organizational structures,
strategic change management
Wilo SE, headquartered in Dortmund, Germany, was a leading supplier of pumps and pump systems for the building services, water management and industrial sectors, which was doing business in more than 50 countries. Based on current global developments in politics, economy, and society, Oliver Hermes, President and CEO of Wilo Group, saw a de-coupling of three tectonic plates centered in China, USA, and Western Europe. At the Wilo management conference in September 2020 Hermes informed stakeholders about the decision to establish a 2nd headquarters in Beijing within the next few months, and possibly to open a 3rd headquarters in the following year in the USA. He stated:

“With the opening of a 2nd headquarters I want to set a sign. Wilo has to keep up with current global developments – whether we like them or not. A stronger regionalization of Wilo is necessary to continue our global success.”

The case text introduces the key measures to establish the 2nd headquarters in China.
Journal Article
eLife
Balazs Aczel, Barnabas Szaszi, Gustav Nilsonne, Olmo R van den Akker, Casper J Albers, Martin Schweinsberg, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers (2021)
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s)
multi analyst studies, open science, data, analytical variability, analyst analytics
Any large dataset can be analyzed in a number of ways, and it is possible that the use of different analysis strategies will lead to different results and conclusions. One way to assess whether the results obtained depend on the analysis strategy chosen is to employ multiple analysts and leave each of them free to follow their own approach. Here, we present consensus-based guidance for conducting and reporting such multi-analyst studies, and we discuss how broader adoption of the multi-analyst approach has the potential to strengthen the robustness of results and conclusions obtained from analyses of datasets in basic and applied research.
Subject(s)
Management sciences, decision sciences and quantitative methods; Product and operations management; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Data, machine learning, data product, pricing, incentives, contracting
This paper explores how firms that lack expertise in machine learning (ML) can leverage the so-called AI Flywheel effect. This effect designates a virtuous cycle by which, as an ML product is adopted and new user data are fed back to the algorithm, the product improves, enabling further adoptions. However, managing this feedback loop is difficult, especially when the algorithm is contracted out. Indeed, the additional data that the AI Flywheel effect generates may change the provider's incentives to improve the algorithm over time. We formalize this problem in a simple two-period moral hazard framework that captures the main dynamics among ML, data acquisition, pricing, and contracting. We find that the firm's decisions crucially depend on how the amount of data on which the machine is trained interacts with the provider's effort. If this effort has a more (less) significant impact on accuracy for larger volumes of data, the firm underprices (overprices) the product. Interestingly, these distortions sometimes improve social welfare, which accounts for the customer surplus and profits of both the firm and provider. Further, the interaction between incentive issues and the positive externalities of the AI Flywheel effect has important implications for the firm's data collection strategy. In particular, the firm can boost its profit by increasing the product's capacity to acquire usage data only up to a certain level. If the product collects too much data per user, the firm's profit may actually decrease, i.e., more data is not necessarily better.
© 2021, INFORMS
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment
Keyword(s)
Reverse privatization, solid waste collection, mixed oligopoly, state-owned enterprises, competition law enforcement, logit regression
JEL Code(s)
L33, L44, L88, H44, K21
After earlier waves of privatization, local governments have increasingly taken back control of local service provisions in some sectors and countries and instead started providing those services themselves (reverse privatization). Using a unique panel dataset on the mode of service provision for solid waste collection for German municipalities that cover the years 2003, 2009, and 2015, we investigate the motives for reverse privatization. Our results show that -- in deciding whether to insource or not -- municipalities react to the cost advantages of private suppliers as well as to the competitive environment and municipal activity: There is more switching to insourcing in concentrated markets and in markets with horizontally or vertically related public services. Local interest groups influence this decision as well.
© 2021 Springer
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Citizen science, crowd science, human-machine integration, open innovation in science
Research projects that actively involve ‘crowds’ or non-professional ‘citizen scientists’ are attracting growing attention. Such projects promise to increase scientific productivity while also connecting science with the general public. We make three contributions. First, we argue that the largely separate literatures on ‘Crowd Science’ and ‘Citizen Science’ investigate strongly overlapping sets of projects but take different disciplinary lenses. Closer integration can enrich research on Crowd and Citizen Science (CS). Second, we propose a framework to profile projects with respect to four types of crowd contributions: activities, knowledge, resources, and decisions. This framework also accommodates machines and algorithms, which increasingly complement or replace professional and non-professional researchers as a third actor. Finally, we outline a research agenda anchored on important underlying organisational challenges of CS projects. This agenda can advance our understanding of Crowd and Citizen Science, yield practical recommendations for project design, and contribute to the broader organisational literature.
Journal Article
Production and Operations Management
Işık Biçer, Florian Lücker, Tamer Boyaci
Subject(s)
Management sciences, decision sciences and quantitative methods; Product and operations management
Keyword(s)
Product proliferation, lead-time reduction, process redesign, delayed differentiation
Product proliferation occurs in supply chains when manufacturers respond to diverse market needs by trying to produce a range of products from a limited variety of raw materials. In such a setting, manufacturers can establish market responsiveness and/or cost efficiency in alternative ways. Delaying the point of the proliferation helps manufacturers improve their responsiveness by postponing the ordering decisions of the final products until there is partial or full resolution of the demand uncertainty. This strategy can be implemented in two different ways: (1) redesigning the operations so that the point of proliferation is swapped with a downstream operation or (2) reducing the lead times. To establish cost efficiency, manufacturers can systematically reduce their operational costs or postpone the high-cost operations. We consider a multi-echelon and multi-product newsvendor problem with demand forecast evolution to analyze the value of each operational lever of the responsiveness and the efficiency. We use a generalized forecast-evolution model to characterize the demand-updating process, and develop a dynamic optimization model to determine the optimal order quantities at different echelons. Using anonymized data of Kordsa Inc., a global manufacturer of advanced composites and reinforcement materials, we show that our model outperforms a theoretical benchmark of the repetitive newsvendor model. We demonstrate that reducing the lead time of a downstream operation is more beneficial to manufacturers than reducing the lead time of an upstream operation by the same amount, whereas reducing the upstream operational costs is more favorable than reducing the downstream operational costs. We also indicate that delaying the proliferation may cause a loss of profit, even if it can be achieved with no additional costs. Finally, a decision typology is developed, which shows effective operational strategies depending on product/market characteristics and process flexibility.
Journal Article
The Economic Journal
David Ronayne, Greg Taylor
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment
JEL Code(s)
D43, D83, L11, M3
We study strategic interactions in markets where firms sell to consumers both directly and via a competitive channel (CC), such as a price comparison website or marketplace, where multiple sellers’ offers are visible at once. We ask how a CC’s size influences market outcomes. A bigger CC means more consumers compare prices, increasing within-channel competition. However, such seemingly pro-competitive developments can raise prices and reduce consumer surplus by weakening between-channel competition. We also use the model to study relevant active policy issues including price clauses, integrated ownership structures, and access to consumers’ purchase data.
Subject(s)
Unspecified
Keyword(s)
attorney perceptions, sexual violence, coercive tactics, measurement, cross-cultural research
In order to study sexual violence internationally, it is helpful to understand similarities and differences in how sexual violence is conceptualised across countries. The current study examined prosecuting attorneys’ judgments about which sexual tactics legally qualify as sexual violence in two countries. Attorneys from the U.S. (n = 28) and Colombia (n = 24) evaluated whether 36 tactics would qualify as a sexual offense in their jurisdiction. Although Colombian and U.S. attorneys agreed on the legality of many tactics, Colombian attorneys judged more behaviours as criminal, on average, than U.S. attorneys. Within-country variations suggested that differences were due not only to different legal statutes, but also to different interpretations of laws. Open-ended responses illustrated sources of ambiguity, including lack of clarity about how much coercion is required and which behaviours indicate nonconsent. This suggests that vagueness within legal definitions may allow attorney judgements to be influenced by stereotypes and prejudices.

Practical Impact Statement: This study illustrates the vagueness of legal definitions of sexual violence in two countries—the United States and Colombia. This vagueness provides prosecuting attorneys with substantial power to interpret the law, and in this study, some attorney judgements of legality seemed to be influenced by stereotypes. Greater training for law students and attorneys about the realities of sexual violence may be helpful in undermining belief in rape myths that may inhibit attorneys from prosecuting certain sexual violence cases.
ISSN (Online)
1742-6545
ISSN (Print)
1355-2600