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ESMT Case Study
ESMT Case Study No. ESMT-321-0193-1
Claire Cardy, Bianca Schmitz, Olaf Plötner, Johannes Habel (2022)
Subject(s)
Strategy and general management
Keyword(s)
Corporate strategy, global trends, organizational structures,
strategic change management
Wilo SE, headquartered in Dortmund, Germany, was a leading supplier of pumps and pump systems for the building services, water management and industrial sectors, which was doing business in more than 50 countries. Based on current global developments in politics, economy, and society, Oliver Hermes, President and CEO of Wilo Group, saw a de-coupling of three tectonic plates centered in China, USA, and Western Europe. At the Wilo management conference in September 2020 Hermes informed stakeholders about the decision to establish a 2nd headquarters in Beijing within the next few months, and possibly to open a 3rd headquarters in the following year in the USA. He stated:

“With the opening of a 2nd headquarters I want to set a sign. Wilo has to keep up with current global developments – whether we like them or not. A stronger regionalization of Wilo is necessary to continue our global success.”

The case text introduces the key measures to establish the 2nd headquarters in China.
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Journal Article
Production and Operations Management 31 (3)
Işık Biçer, Florian Lücker, Tamer Boyaci (2022)
Subject(s)
Management sciences, decision sciences and quantitative methods; Product and operations management
Keyword(s)
Product proliferation, lead-time reduction, process redesign, delayed differentiation
Product proliferation occurs in supply chains when manufacturers respond to diverse market needs by trying to produce a range of products from a limited variety of raw materials. In such a setting, manufacturers can establish market responsiveness and/or cost efficiency in alternative ways. Delaying the point of the proliferation helps manufacturers improve their responsiveness by postponing the ordering decisions of the final products until there is partial or full resolution of the demand uncertainty. This strategy can be implemented in two different ways: (1) redesigning the operations so that the point of proliferation is swapped with a downstream operation or (2) reducing the lead times. To establish cost efficiency, manufacturers can systematically reduce their operational costs or postpone the high-cost operations. We consider a multi-echelon and multi-product newsvendor problem with demand forecast evolution to analyze the value of each operational lever of the responsiveness and the efficiency. We use a generalized forecast-evolution model to characterize the demand-updating process, and develop a dynamic optimization model to determine the optimal order quantities at different echelons. Using anonymized data of Kordsa Inc., a global manufacturer of advanced composites and reinforcement materials, we show that our model outperforms a theoretical benchmark of the repetitive newsvendor model. We demonstrate that reducing the lead time of a downstream operation is more beneficial to manufacturers than reducing the lead time of an upstream operation by the same amount, whereas reducing the upstream operational costs is more favorable than reducing the downstream operational costs. We also indicate that delaying the proliferation may cause a loss of profit, even if it can be achieved with no additional costs. Finally, a decision typology is developed, which shows effective operational strategies depending on product/market characteristics and process flexibility.
Volume
31
Journal Article
Review of Industrial Organization 60: 217–261
Juri Demuth, Hans W. Friederiszick, Steffen Reinhold (2022)
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment
Keyword(s)
Reverse privatization, solid waste collection, mixed oligopoly, state-owned enterprises, competition law enforcement, logit regression
JEL Code(s)
L33, L44, L88, H44, K21
After earlier waves of privatization, local governments have increasingly taken back control of local service provisions in some sectors and countries and instead started providing those services themselves (reverse privatization). Using a unique panel dataset on the mode of service provision for solid waste collection for German municipalities that cover the years 2003, 2009, and 2015, we investigate the motives for reverse privatization. Our results show that -- in deciding whether to insource or not -- municipalities react to the cost advantages of private suppliers as well as to the competitive environment and municipal activity: There is more switching to insourcing in concentrated markets and in markets with horizontally or vertically related public services. Local interest groups influence this decision as well.
© 2022 Springer
Journal Pages
217–261
Journal Article
The Economic Journal 132 (642): 741–766
David Ronayne, Greg Taylor (2022)
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment
JEL Code(s)
D43, D83, L11, M3
We study strategic interactions in markets where firms sell to consumers both directly and via a competitive channel (CC), such as a price comparison website or marketplace, where multiple sellers’ offers are visible at once. We ask how a CC’s size influences market outcomes. A bigger CC means more consumers compare prices, increasing within-channel competition. However, such seemingly pro-competitive developments can raise prices and reduce consumer surplus by weakening between-channel competition. We also use the model to study relevant active policy issues including price clauses, integrated ownership structures, and access to consumers’ purchase data.
Volume
132
Journal Pages
741–766
Journal Article
Industry and Innovation 29 (2): 251–284
Chiara Franzoni, Marion Poetz, Henry Sauermann (2022)
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Citizen science, crowd science, human-machine integration, open innovation in science
Research projects that actively involve ‘crowds’ or non-professional ‘citizen scientists’ are attracting growing attention. Such projects promise to increase scientific productivity while also connecting science with the general public. We make three contributions. First, we argue that the largely separate literatures on ‘Crowd Science’ and ‘Citizen Science’ investigate strongly overlapping sets of projects but take different disciplinary lenses. Closer integration can enrich research on Crowd and Citizen Science (CS). Second, we propose a framework to profile projects with respect to four types of crowd contributions: activities, knowledge, resources, and decisions. This framework also accommodates machines and algorithms, which increasingly complement or replace professional and non-professional researchers as a third actor. Finally, we outline a research agenda anchored on important underlying organisational challenges of CS projects. This agenda can advance our understanding of Crowd and Citizen Science, yield practical recommendations for project design, and contribute to the broader organisational literature.
Volume
29
Journal Pages
251–284
Journal Article
Industry and Innovation 29 (2): 136–185
Henry Sauermann, Susanne Beck, Carsten Bergenholtz, Marcel Bogers, Tiare-Maria Brasseur, Marie Louise Conradsen, Diletta Di Marco et al. (2022)
Subject(s)
Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Open innovation in Science, openness, collaboration in science, Open Science, interdisciplinary research
Openness and collaboration in scientific research are attracting increasing attention from scholars and practitioners alike. However, a common understanding of these phenomena is hindered by disciplinary boundaries and disconnected research streams. We link dispersed knowledge on Open Innovation, Open Science, and related concepts such as Responsible Research and Innovation by proposing a unifying Open Innovation in Science (OIS) Research Framework. This framework captures the antecedents, contingencies, and consequences of open and collaborative practices along the entire process of generating and disseminating scientific insights and translating them into innovation. Moreover, it elucidates individual-, team-, organisation-, field-, and society‐level factors shaping OIS practices. To conceptualise the framework, we employed a collaborative approach involving 47 scholars from multiple disciplines, highlighting both tensions and commonalities between existing approaches. The OIS Research Framework thus serves as a basis for future research, informs policy discussions, and provides guidance to scientists and practitioners.
Volume
29
Journal Pages
136–185
Journal Article
Economic Inquiry
Reint Gropp, Steven Ongena, Jörg Rocholl, Vahid Saadi (2022)
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment; Finance, accounting and corporate governance
Keyword(s)
Banking crises, cleansing effect, productivity growth, supervisory forbearence
We assess the cleansing effects of the 2008–2009 financial crisis. U.S. regions with higher levels of supervisory forbearance on distressed banks see less restructuring in the real sector: fewer establishments, firms, and jobs are lost when more distressed banks remain in business. In these regions, the banking sector has been less healthy for several years after the crisis. Regions with less forbearance experience higher productivity growth after the crisis with more firm entries, job creation, and employment, wages, patents, and output growth. Forbearance is greater for state-chartered banks and in regions with weaker banking competition and more independent banks.
© 2022 Western Economic Association International.
ISSN (Online)
1465-7295
Journal Article
kes – Die Zeitschrift für Informations-Sicherheit 38 (1)
Lola Attenberger (2022)
Subject(s)
Information technology and systems
Keyword(s)
cybersecurity, urban crisis management, digital policy, civil protection, disaster management
Critical infrastructure protection is a joint task of the state and the economy. Nevertheless, there does not yet exist any standardized approach for a common risk management approach. This article proposes such a methodology, leaning on ISO 27000-series and implying three perspectives: the technical, micro perspective, the organizational macro perspective besides the country-wide meta perspective.
Volume
38
Journal Article
Industry and Innovation 29 (2): 131–135


Susanne Beck, Christoph Grimpe, Marion Poetz, Henry Sauermann (2022)
Subject(s)
Strategy and general management; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Open innovation in science, scientific research, openness in science, collaboration in science, inter- and transdisciplinary research
This introduction discusses Open Innovation in Science (OIS) as an emerging stream of research and summarizes the articles published in the Special Issue on this topic.
Volume
29
Journal Pages
131–135
Journal Article
Research in the Sociology of Organizations 77: 111–136
Matthew S. Bothner, Frederic C. Godart, Noah Askin, Wonjae Lee (2022)
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior; Management sciences, decision sciences and quantitative methods; Strategy and general management
Keyword(s)
Sociology, status, cognate concepts
Status constitutes a core research concept across the social sciences. However, its definition is still contested, and questions persist about its consequences. We begin with a flexible, provisional definition: status is a relational asset possessed by social actors insofar as they are highly regarded by highly-regarded others. Using this definition as a backdrop, we develop a fourfold typology based on how status is used as an asset and from where it is derived. The typology allows us to explore the implications of considering status as either a quality-signal or a good, and of viewing status-conferring ties as either deference-based or dominance-based. We then consider the implications of our framework for the generation of novelty. Although status has been connected to many social and economic outcomes, because of competing predictions in the literature—the generation of novelty has been linked to all regions of the status distribution—we sketch intuitions for future research on the status-novelty linkage. We also work toward greater conceptual clarity by comparing and contrasting status with selected related concepts: quality, reputation, and legitimacy. We conclude with considerations of future research, including cautionary remarks regarding network-analytic measurement in light of the definition we propose.
Copyright © 2022 Matthew S. Bothner, Frédéric Godart, Noah Askin and Wonjae Lee
Volume
77
Journal Pages
111–136
ISSN (Online)
978-1-78756-591-3
ISSN (Print)
978-1-78756-592-0