Skip to main content
Publication records
Conference Proceeding
Academy of Management Proceedings 2021 (1)
Tatiana Lluent (2021)
Subject(s)
Diversity and inclusion; Human resources management/organizational behavior; Strategy and general management
Keyword(s)
Organizational inequality, M&A, gender, cultural norms, careers, wage gap
Extant literature in organizational inequality shows that environmental forces affect firm gender equality outcomes. While there is evidence that national gender culture affects individual economic outcomes, little is known about the influence of national gender culture at the firm-level. In this article, I use the context of cross-border acquisitions to study how national culture shapes firms’ arrangements towards gender equality as I explore how foreign acquisitions affect workplace gender equality at acquired firms. I use restricted-access employer-employee data from France matched to M&A data. I use a generalized differences-in differences approach to estimate the impact of acquirer national gender culture on gender equality outcomes at acquired firms after an acquisition. I find that firms acquired by acquirers from more gender egalitarian countries see a larger increase in female representation in management and larger decrease in gender pay gap post-acquisition, compared to firms that get acquired by acquirers from less gender egalitarian countries. This main effect is stronger when the post-acquisition integration process is more thorough and when a new CEO is appointed at the acquired firm.
With permission of the Academy of Management
Volume
2021
ISSN (Online)
2151-6561
ISSN (Print)
0065-0668
Conference Proceeding
Academy of Management Proceedings 2021 (1)
2021 AOM Best Paper Award Best Paper Proceedings
Chengwei Liu, Chia-Jung Tsay (2021)
Subject(s)
Diversity and inclusion; Strategy and general management
Keyword(s)
Chance models, adaptation, organizational learning, luck, situation, risk-taking
Chance models—mechanisms that explain empirical regularities through unsystematic variance—have a long tradition in the sciences but have been historically marginalized in management scholarship. An exception is the work of James G. March and his coauthors, who proposed a variety of chance models that explain important management phenomena, including the careers of top executives, managerial risk taking, and organizational anarchy, learning, and adaptation. This paper serves as a tribute to the beauty of these “little ideas” and demonstrates how they can be recombined to generate novel implications. In particular, we focus on the example of an inverted V-shaped performance association among the executives featured in one of the most prominent lists of executives, Barron’s annual list of Top 30 chief executive officers. A reanalysis of March and Shapira’s 1992 model provides a novel explanation for why many of the executives’ exceptional performances did not persist. In contrast to the usual explanations of complacency, hubris, and statistical regression, the results show that declines may result from these executives’ slow adaptation, incompetence, and self-reinforced risk taking. We conclude by elaborating on the normative implications of Jim’s chance models, which address many modern management and societal challenges. We further encourage the continued development of chance models to help explain performance differences, shifting from accounts that favor heroic stories of corporate leaders toward accounts that favor those leaders’ changing fortunes.
With permission of the Academy of Management
Volume
2021
ISSN (Online)
2151-6561
ISSN (Print)
0065-0668
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment
Keyword(s)
Cartels, private damages, competition law
Private cartel damages litigation is on the rise in Europe since early 2000. This development has been initiated by the European courts and was supported by various policy initiatives of the European Commission, which found its culmination in the implementation of the EU Directive on Antitrust Damages end of 2016. This paper explores the impact of this reform process on effective compensation of damaged parties of cartel infringements. For that purpose we analyse all European cartel cases with a decision date between 2001 and 2015, for which we analyse litigation activity and speed. Overall, we find a substantial reduction of the time until first settlement (increase in litigation speed) together with a persisting high share of cases being litigated (high litigation activity). This supports the view that the reform not only increased the claimant’s expectation about the amount of damages being awarded, but also resulted in an alignment in the expectations of claimants and defendants in the final damages amount, i.e. the European Commission succeeded in reaching its objective to clarify and harmonize legal concepts across Europe.
Volume
9
Journal Pages
313–346
Journal Article
Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes 165: 228–249
Martin Schweinsberg, Michael Feldman, Nicola Staub, Olmo R. van der Akker, Robbie C.M. van Aert, Marcel A.L.M. van Assen, Yang Liu et al. (2021)
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s)
Crowdsourcing data analysis, scientific transparency, research reliability, scientific
robustness, researcher degrees of freedom, analysis-contingent results
In this crowdsourced initiative, independent analysts used the same dataset to test two hypotheses regarding the effects of scientists’ gender and professional status on verbosity during group meetings. Not only the analytic approach but also the operationalizations of key variables were left unconstrained and up to individual analysts. For instance, analysts could choose to operationalize status as job title, institutional ranking, citation counts, or some combination. To maximize transparency regarding the process by which analytic choices are made, the analysts used a platform we developed called DataExplained to justify both preferred and rejected analytic paths in real time. Analyses lacking sufficient detail, reproducible code, or with statistical errors were excluded, resulting in 29 analyses in the final sample. Researchers reported radically different analyses and dispersed empirical outcomes, in a number of cases obtaining significant effects in opposite directions for the same research question. A Boba multiverse analysis demonstrates that decisions about how to operationalize variables explain variability in outcomes above and beyond statistical choices (e.g., covariates). Subjective researcher decisions play a critical role in driving the reported empirical results, underscoring the need for open data, systematic robustness checks, and transparency regarding both analytic paths taken and not taken. Implications for organizations and leaders, whose decision making relies in part on scientific findings, consulting reports, and internal analyses by data scientists, are discussed.
With permission of Elsevier
Volume
165
Journal Pages
228–249
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment; Information technology and systems; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Cybersecurity, information security, information law, critical infrastructures, cyber regulation
Two articles explain the genesis and contents of the German IT Security Act 2.0, which was enacted in May 2021. This first article focuses on the origins of the law, the obligations of companies as operators of information technology, and the new regulations on the security of IT products.
Journal Pages
450–458
ISSN (Online)
2194-4172
Journal Article
Harvard Business Review
David Ronayne, Daniel Sgroi, Anthony Tuckwell (2021)
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment
Keyword(s)
Decision biases, Sunk cost effect, Susceptibility scale, Cognitive ability, incentivized experiment
The sunk cost effect is one of the most well-known decision making biases. In this article, I describe how my co-authors and I developed an 8-item test comprised of hypothetical scenarios to determine the respondent’s susceptibility to the sunk cost effect. We validate the scale with an incentivized experiment. We also find evidence that experience, rather than smarts, which helps people to avoid falling foul of the effect.


ISSN (Print)
0017-8012
Subject(s)
Strategy and general management
Journal Pages
34–36
Journal Article
Datenschutz und Datensicherheit 45 (7): 438–443
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment; Information technology and systems; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
AI, artificial intelligence, privay, data protection, information law
The European Commission has presented proposals for the horizontal regulation of artificial intelligence. It is thus foreseeable that the regulatory systems of data protection and IT security will be supplemented by a further cross-sectoral approach to the regulation of information technology. This article explains the proposals and describes their advantages and disadvantages.

[Die Europäische Kommission hat Vorschläge vorgelegt, wie eine horizontale Regulierung künstlicher Intelligenz erfolgen soll. Damit ist absehbar, dass neben die Regulierungssysteme des Datenschutzes und der IT-Sicherheit ein weiterer sektorübergreifender Ansatz zur Regulierung von Informationstechnik treten wird.]
Volume
45
Journal Pages
438–443
ISSN (Online)
1862-2607
ISSN (Print)
1614-0702
Journal Article
Journal of Organization Design 10 (2): 85–91
Subject(s)
Diversity and inclusion; Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s)
Random selection, diversity bonus, luck, decision biases, paradox of merit, learning traps
Complex tasks often cannot be addressed with expertise, but instead by assembling a diverse cognitive repertoire in teams. In such cases, engaging diversity may enhance performance. Yet various behavioral and social limits often deter organizations from recognizing or integrating valuable diversity. I argue that random selection is an undervalued tool for capturing the diversity bonus because it helps address (1) the paradox of merit, by avoiding fruitless deliberation; (2) biased reasoning, by deciding on the basis of no reason; and (3) learning traps, by discovering self-confirming false beliefs. More generally, incorporating random selection in organizational design can generate a less-is-more effect: deciding by blind luck means exercising less control over outcomes but achieving more by saving time and resources, as well as detecting and sanitizing biased reasons.
Volume
10
Journal Pages
85–91
ISSN (Online)
2245-408X
Subject(s)
Diversity and inclusion; Human resources management/organizational behavior; Strategy and general management
Keyword(s)
Luck, stereotype bias, grit, regression to the mean
Managers are very prone to both benchmarking and stereotyping. These practices lead them into underestimating the power of luck, so that they often attribute success to capabilities and failure to bad luck in people or organizations they see as having the attributes of greatness, while they discount capabilities and attribute success to luck in people or organizations that do not conform to their ideas of greatness. Looking at second-level performers (where luck probably plays a lesser role) may be a smarter way to benchmark.
ISSN (Print)
0017-8012