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Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s)
Negotiation, impasse, getting to no
All day, every day, most of us are bombarded by requests at work. Sometimes these can pile up leaving us feeling overwhelmed. Learning the right way to turn some down can help us stay in our jobs, as happier and more productive employees.
Book Chapter
In The Oxford Handbook of Cyber Security, edited by Paul Cornish, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Secondary Title
The Oxford Handbook of Cyber Security
ISBN
9780198800682
Journal Article
Organization Studies 43 (1): 35–57
Francois Collet, Gianluca Carnabuci, Gorkhan Ertug, Tengjian Zou (2022)
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior; Strategy and general management
Keyword(s)
Congress, ideology, influence, social capital, status
Prior research assumes that high-status actors have greater organizational influence than lower-status ones, that is, it is easier for the former to get their ideas and initiatives adopted by the organization than it is for the latter. Drawing from the literature on ideology, we posit that the status–influence link is contingent on actors’ ideological position. Specifically, status confers organizational influence to the degree that the focal actor is ideologically mainstream. The more an actor’s ideology deviates from the mainstream the less will her status translate into increased organizational influence. We find support for this hypothesis using data on the work of legislators in the House of Representatives in the United States Congress. By illuminating how and under what conditions status leads to increased influence, this study qualifies and extends current understandings of the role of status in organizations.
With permission of SAGE Publishing
Volume
43
Journal Pages
35–57
Journal Article
Journal of Management 48 (1): 49–76
Martin Schweinsberg, Stefan Thau, Madan M. Pillutla (2022)
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s)
impasses, negotiations, agreements, conflict resolution, bargaining
Although impasses are frequently experienced by negotiators, are featured in newspaper articles, and are reflected in online searches, and can be costly, negotiation scholarship does not appear to consider them seriously as phenomenon worth explaining. A review of negotiation tasks to study impasses reveals that they bias negotiators towards agreement. We systematically organize past findings on impasses and integrate them in the impasse type, cause, and resolution model (ITCR model). Our fundamental assumption is that a positive bargaining zone does not imply symmetric preferences for an agreement. One or both negotiators may prefer an impasse over an agreement despite a positive bargaining zone. We argue that it is beneficial for management research to distinguish between three impasse types: if both negotiators perceive benefit from an impasse, they are wanted; if one negotiator perceives benefits from an impasse, they are forced; and if both do not perceive benefits from the impasse, they are unwanted. We review structural (e.g., bargaining zone, communication channels), interpersonal (e.g., tough tactics, emotions) and intrapersonal (e.g., biases, available information, and framing) factors as the likely antecedents of the three impasse types. We also examine evidence which suggests that wanted impasses can be resolved by changing the negotiation structure for both parties, forced impasses can be resolved through persuasion, and unwanted impasses can be overcome by debiasing both parties. Finally, we review current methodological guidance and provide updated recommendations on how scholars should deal with impasses in both study designs and data analyses.
With permission of SAGE Publishing
Volume
48
Journal Pages
49–76
Journal Article
CERN IdeaSquare Journal of Experimental Innovation 5 (2): 28–49
Susanne Beck, Janet Bercovitz, Carsten Bergenholtz, Brasseur Brasseur, Pablo D’Este, Amelie Dorn, Henry Sauermann (2021)
Subject(s)
Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Open Innovation in Science, co-production of scientific research, co-developing research proposals
Co-producing scientific research with those who are affected by it is an emerging phenomenon in contemporary science. This article summarizes and reflects on both the process and outcome of a novel experiment to co-develop scientific research proposals in the field of Open Innovation in Science (OIS), wherein scholars engaged in the study of open and collaborative practices collaborated with the “users” of their research, i.e., scientists who apply such practices in their own research.The resulting co-developed research proposals focus on scientific collaboration, open data, and knowledge sharing and are available as an appendix to this article.
Volume
5
Journal Pages
28–49
Journal Article
MIT Sloan Management Review 63 (2)
Thorsten Grohsjean, Linus Dahlander, Ammon Salter (2021)
Subject(s)
Strategy and general management; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Innovation strategy
Organizations can make better choices about which R&D projects gain funding by managing bias and involving more people.
Volume
63
Subject(s)
Product and operations management
The structure of the efficiency-driven industry model contributed to supply chain failures under the pandemic. Industry leaders must now pursue alternative strategies to create resilience, despite the risks.
ISSN (Print)
0015-6914
Journal Article
Harvard Business Review
Viktoria Boss, Linus Dahlander, Christoph Ihl, Rajshri Jayaraman (2021)
Subject(s)
Entrepreneurship; Technology, R&D management
ISSN (Print)
0017-8012
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior
This book is a collection of challenging cases in executive coaching from the annals of the ESMT-Berlin Coaching Colloquia - yearly events for experienced professionals committed to advancement of the coaching profession. In the period of 2009-2018, hundreds of difficult cases were discussed by coaches from all over the world in an intensive but safe environment of the ESMT Berlin Campus. This volume presents a few of those cases to the interested public and offers a unique opportunity to explore the work of coaches from within and to reflect upon ways professionals approach ambiguous moments in their practice. The cases do not serve the purpose to endorse or critique a particular coaching choice, but rather give the reader an opportunity to think about their own ways of handling professional challenges in coaching engagements. The book can be an exciting self-development tool or instructional material for courses in coaching training or supervision.
Volume
2nd ed.,
ISBN
979-8769553929
Journal Article
The Economic Journal
Bernd Fitzenberger, Gary Mena, Jan Sebastian Nimczik, Uwe Sunde (2021)
Subject(s)
Economics, politics and business environment
JEL Code(s)
D8, J1
Economists increasingly recognise the importance of personality traits for socio-economic outcomes, but little is known about the stability of these traits over the life cycle. Existing empirical contributions typically focus on age patterns and disregard cohort and period influences. This paper contributes novel evidence for the separability of age, period, and cohort effects for a broad range of personality traits based on systematic specification tests for disentangling age, period and cohort influences. Our estimates document that for different cohorts, the evolution of personality traits across the life cycle follows a stable, though non-constant, age profile, while there are sizeable differences across time periods.