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Journal Article
Harvard Business Review
Linus Dahlander, Martin Wallin (2020)
Subject(s)
Strategy and general management; Technology, R&D management
ISSN (Print)
0017-8012
Journal Article
The Journal of Applied Behavioral Science 56 (2): 143–165
Angeliki Papachroni, Loizos Heracleous (2020)
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s)
Paradox, individual ambidexterity, exploration, exploitation
Following the turn to practice in organization theory and the emerging interest in the microfoundations of ambidexterity, understanding the role of individuals in realizing ambidexterity approaches becomes crucial. Drawing insights from Greek philosophy on paradoxes, and practice theory on paradoxes and ambidexterity, we propose a view of individual ambidexterity grounded in paradoxical practices. Existing conceptualizations of ambidexterity are largely based on separation strategies. Contrary to this perspective, we argue that individual ambidexterity can be accomplished via paradoxical practices that renegotiate or transcend boundaries of exploration and exploitation. We identify three such paradoxical practices at the individual level that can advance understanding of ambidexterity: engaging in “hybrid tasks,” capitalizing cumulatively on previous learning, and adopting a mindset of seeking synergies between the competing demands of exploration and exploitation.
With permission of SAGE Publishing
Volume
56
Journal Pages
143–165
ISSN (Online)
1552-6879
Journal Article
Research Policy 49 (5): 103978
Henry Sauermann, Katrin Vohland, Vyron Antoniou, Bálint Balázs, Claudia Göbel, Kostas Karatzas, Peter Mooney et al. (2020)
Subject(s)
Health and environment; Human resources management/organizational behavior; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Citizen science, crowd science, co-design, sustainability transitions, science and innovation studies, science education
Citizen Science (CS) projects involve members of the general public as active participants in research. While some advocates hope that CS can increase scientific knowledge production (“productivity view”), others emphasize that it may bridge a perceived gap between science and the broader society (“democratization view”). We discuss how an integration of both views can allow Citizen Science to support complex sustainability transitions in areas such as renewable energy, public health, or environmental conservation. We first identify three pathways through which such impacts can occur: (1) Problem identification and agenda setting; (2) Resource mobilization; and (3) Facilitating socio-technical co-evolution. To realize this potential, however, CS needs to address important challenges that emerge especially in the context of sustainability transitions: Increasing the diversity, level, and intensity of participation; addressing the social as well as technical nature of sustainability problems; and reducing tensions between CS and the traditional institution of academic science. Grounded in a review of academic literature and policy reports as well as a broad range of case examples, this article contributes to scholarship on science, innovation, and sustainability transitions. We also offer insights for actors involved in initiating or institutionalizing Citizen Science efforts, including project organizers, funding agencies, and policy makers.
With permission of Elsevier
Volume
49
Journal Pages
103978
Journal Article
Israel Law Review 53 (2): 189–224
2020 Best Paper Award
Subject(s)
Information technology and systems
Keyword(s)
Information operations, cyber operations, cognitive warfare, disinformation, election interference, principle of non-intervention, sovereignty, self-determination
The article examines the legal qualification of state-led information operations that aim to undermine democratic decision-making processes in other states. After a survey of the legal attitudes of states towards such operations during the Cold War, the impact of the digital transformation on the frequency and quality of information operations is explained. The article then assesses scholarly responses to the outlined paradigm shift regarding the prohibition of intervention, respect for sovereignty and the principle of self-determination. The study then inquires whether it is possible to detect a change in how states qualify adversarial information operations by tracking recent state practice and official statements of opinio juris. The survey concludes that there is insufficient uniformity to allow for an inference that the content of the analysed rules of customary international law has already shifted towards more restrictive treatment of foreign interference. As a possible way forward, the article ends with a proposal to focus on deceptive and manipulative conduct of information operations as the most viable path to outlaw such state behavior in the future. Instead of attempting to regulate the content of information, this approach is better suited to safeguard freedom of speech and other potentially affected civil rights.
© Cambridge University Press and The Faculty of Law, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem 2020
Volume
53
Journal Pages
189–224
ISSN (Online)
2047-9336
ISSN (Print)
0021-2237
ESMT Case Study
ESMT Case Study No. ESMT-420-0188-1
Christian Röttjer, Konstantin Korotov (2020)
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s)
Perception, communication, leadership, digital transformation, change management
This compact case describes an incident between an aspiring manager and an employee, related to an interpretation of expected engagement of the latter in a planned Agile Boot Camp—an event designed to bolster the transfer of the organization towards new ways of working. Alexander, the main case protagonist, overhears Victor, his employee, say that he will take only a passive part in the event since it is classified by Human Resources (HR) as training, and not as a workshop, in terms of how working time for such an activity is accounted for. Alexander, for whom the Boot Camp is very important, feels the urge to engage in the conversation (which he does in part B of the case).
Key teaching/learning objectives
1. Explore the influence of perception, cognitive dissonance, and communication on employee choices
2. Explore students' reactions to situations where their authority and intent are challenged (overtly or covertly)
3. Discuss resistance and reluctance to change
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ESMT Case Study
ESMT Case Study No. ESMT-420-0189-1
Christian Röttjer, Konstantin Korotov (2020)
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s)
Perception, communication, leadership, digital transformation, change management
This compact case describes an incident between an aspiring manager and an employee, related to an interpretation of expected engagement of the latter in a planned Agile Boot Camp—an event designed to bolster the transfer of the organization towards new ways of working. Alexander, the main case protagonist, overhears Victor, his employee, say that he will take only a passive part in the event since it is classified by Human Resources (HR) as training, and not as a workshop, in terms of how working time for such an activity is accounted for. Alexander, for whom the Boot Camp is very important, feels the urge to engage in the conversation (which he does in part B of the case).
Key teaching/learning objectives
1. Explore the influence of perception, cognitive dissonance, and communication on employee choices
2. Explore students' reactions to situations where their authority and intent are challenged (overtly or covertly)
3. Discuss resistance and reluctance to change
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Journal Article
Review of Finance 24 (3): 529–578
Tobias Berg, Manju Puri, Jörg Rocholl (2020)
Subject(s)
Finance, accounting and corporate governance
Keyword(s)
Loan officer incentives, internal ratings, hard information, Lucas critique
JEL Code(s)
G20, G21
Volume
24
Journal Pages
529–578
Online article
Forbes
Subject(s)
Diversity and inclusion; Ethics and social responsibility
Keyword(s)
sustainability, corporate responsibility, climate change, gender equality, diversity, millennials, stakeholder engagement
Our work as educators and researchers, we’ve noticed that two issues are more salient for #youngtalent than for many leaders at top companies: global warming and gender diversity. How can companies understand young people’s perspectives and gather their creative ideas for driving business and doing good?
ISSN (Print)
0015-6914
Keyword(s)
COVID-19, WHO, international law, international responsibility, International Court of Justice, reparation, compensation, pandemic, International Health Regulations, no harm principle, causality
Journal Article
Psychological Bulletin 146 (5): 451–479
Justin Landy, Miaolei Jia, Isabel Ding, Domenico Viganola, Warrent Tierney, Martin Schweinsberg, Eric Uhlmann et al. (2020)
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s)
Crowdsourcing, scientific transparency, stimulus sampling, forecasting, conceptual replications, research robustness
Volume
146
Journal Pages
451–479
ISSN (Online)
1939-1455