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Journal Article
Industry and Innovation
Henry Sauermann, Susanne Beck, Carsten Bergenholtz, Marcel Bogers, Tiare-Maria Brasseur, Marie Louise Conradsen, Diletta Di Marco et al.
Subject(s)
Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Open innovation in Science, openness, collaboration in science, Open Science, interdisciplinary research
Openness and collaboration in scientific research are attracting increasing attention from scholars and practitioners alike. However, a common understanding of these phenomena is hindered by disciplinary boundaries and disconnected research streams. We link dispersed knowledge on Open Innovation, Open Science, and related concepts such as Responsible Research and Innovation by proposing a unifying Open Innovation in Science (OIS) Research Framework. This framework captures the antecedents, contingencies, and consequences of open and collaborative practices along the entire process of generating and disseminating scientific insights and translating them into innovation. Moreover, it elucidates individual-, team-, organisation-, field-, and society‐level factors shaping OIS practices. To conceptualise the framework, we employed a collaborative approach involving 47 scholars from multiple disciplines, highlighting both tensions and commonalities between existing approaches. The OIS Research Framework thus serves as a basis for future research, informs policy discussions, and provides guidance to scientists and practitioners.
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s)
Corporate culture, remote work, leadership

ISSN (Print)
0015-6914
Subject(s)
Information technology and systems; Strategy and general management; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Cybersecurity, cyberattack, cyber defence
Cyberattacks have become part of every company’s daily routine. Every business leader must therefore prepare for a situation in which their company is successfully attacked. Defending against a cyberattack requires many parallel activities – assessing the impact, implementing technical defense measures, collecting evidence, rebuilding reliable IT systems and business processes, and communicating with customers and partners. The article describes five lessons that will help business leaders on Day X to successfully manage a serious and complex cyberattack.
ISSN (Print)
0015-6914
Subject(s)
Information technology and systems
Keyword(s)
Surveillance, constitutional law, human rights, freedom of information, freedom of expression, journalism, disinformation, fake news
The Federal Chancellery recently finished its first draft of the revised Foreign Intelligence Service Law (BND-Gesetz) that has become necessary subsequent to the judgment of the Federal Constitutional Court in May of 2020. While the draft bill contains numerous improvements, some crucial provisions pertaining to the treatment of journalists and their trusted sources remain insufficient. The article analyses some of the problems.
Magazine article
Informationen zur politischen Bildung 344 (3): 52–61
Henning Christian Lahmann, Philipp Otto (2020)
Keyword(s)
digital transformation, human rights, cyberwar, surveillance, espionage, cybercrime, autonomous weapons systems
Over the past two decades, the progressing digital transformation has brought along a growing number of challenges in the context of security: internet crime, cyberwar and espionage, surveillance and autonomous weapons systems. While increased security measures seem indispensable, they need to be weighed against individual human rights guarantees. This chapter provides an overview of the pertinent questions.
Volume
344
Journal Pages
52–61
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior; Strategy and general management
Keyword(s)
Success, ideology, influence
ISSN (Print)
0015-6914
Online article
Forbes
Nora Grasselli, Bethan Williams (2020)
Subject(s)
Human resources management/organizational behavior
Keyword(s)
Leadership, global virtual teams, gamification
We explore how gamification can be used to help leaders to lead global virtual teams.
ISSN (Print)
0015-6914
Conference Proceeding
Academy of Management Proceedings 2020 (1)
Henry Sauermann, Katrin Vohland, Vyron Antoniou, Bálint Balázs, Claudia Göbel, Kostas Karatzas, Peter Mooney et al. (2020)
Subject(s)
Health and environment; Human resources management/organizational behavior; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Citizen science, crowd science, co-design, sustainability transitions, science and innovation studies, science education
Citizen Science (CS) projects involve members of the general public as active participants in research. While some advocates hope that CS can increase scientific knowledge production (“productivity view”), others emphasize that it may bridge a perceived gap between science and the broader society (“democratization view”). We discuss how an integration of both views can allow Citizen Science to support complex sustainability transitions in areas such as renewable energy, public health, or environmental conservation. We first identify three pathways through which such impacts can occur: (1) Problem identification and agenda setting; (2) Resource mobilization; and (3) Facilitating socio-technical co-evolution. To realize this potential, however, CS needs to address important challenges that emerge especially in the context of sustainability transitions: Increasing the diversity, level, and intensity of participation; addressing the social as well as technical nature of sustainability problems; and reducing tensions between CS and the traditional institution of academic science. Grounded in a review of academic literature and policy reports as well as a broad range of case examples, this article contributes to scholarship on science, innovation, and sustainability transitions. We also offer insights for actors involved in initiating or institutionalizing Citizen Science efforts, including project organizers, funding agencies, and policy makers.
With permission of the Academy of Management
Volume
2020
ISSN (Online)
2151-6561
ISSN (Print)
0065-0668
Conference Proceeding
Academy of Management Proceedings 2020 (1)
Stefan Wagner, Karin Hoisl (2020)
Subject(s)
Strategy and general management; Technology, R&D management
Keyword(s)
Personality, inventive performance, search, knowledge production, innovation
The search for external knowledge increases inventive performance. We extend this established view by considering how an inventor’s personality is related to her inventive performance. Focusing on plasticity, a higher-order personality trait comprising openness to new experience as well as extraversion, we propose that plasticity is positively related to inventive performance. This effect can be decomposed in a direct effect (plasticity => performance) and an indirect mediated effect via its association to search behavior (plasticity => external search => performance). We test our theoretical predictions in a model of moderated mediation relying on a sample of 1,327 industrial inventors. A positive direct effect of plasticity on inventive performance can be identified across all inventors. The overall positive effect of external search, however, is more pronounced for inventors characterized by low levels of plasticity.
With permission of the Academy of Management
Volume
2020
ISSN (Online)
2151-6561
ISSN (Print)
0065-0668
Conference Proceeding
Academy of Management Proceedings 2020 (1)
Jerker C. Denrell, Michael Christinsen, Chengwei Liu, Thorbjorn Knudsen (2020)
Many organizations employ algorithms that learn from their members and then shape the way these individuals learn. Nevertheless, decades of research on organizational learning suggests that imperfect learning algorithms could sustain suboptimal beliefs that trap organizations indefinitely. To study potential algorithmic learning traps, we solve the underexplored theoretical properties of the March 1991 mutual learning model and demonstrate the conditions under which individuals should trust learning algorithms' recommendations. Our results show that the received wisdom regarding the benefit of slow learning and diversity does not hold when algorithms cannot identity accurate beliefs but follow the majority. The presence of non- discerning or even manipulated algorithms suggests that individuals should learn fast instead of slow to reduce the chance that algorithms learn the wrong, misleading lessons that would otherwise diffuse and contaminate everyone. Our exploitation of the March model generates novel insights that are increasingly relevant, thus promoting the model's generalization and making its beauty more robust.
With permission of the Academy of Management ​​​​
Volume
2020
ISSN (Online)
2151-6561
ISSN (Print)
0065-0668